How to Write Love in Japanese

Опубликовал Admin
10-08-2021, 02:50
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Love is a powerful word, especially in the Japanese language. However, when it comes to Japanese, that doesn't mean a lot if you can't write or speak the word! Japanese is a complex language with three alphabets, so it can be difficult to know how to write "love" in Japanese. But by learning how to write the strokes properly and produce the word you're looking for, you'll be one step closer to writing someone a Japanese love letter.

Steps

  1. Know the different types of love. In Japanese, due to the varying ways of saying certain things based on politeness and the weight some words can carry, it's important to know what the different types of love are. The three most commonly used are 好き (suki), 愛 (ai), and 恋 (koi).
  2. Know how "好き" is used. Suki is the most common way of expressing love, although when translated to English, it would be closer to the definition of "like" than "love". However, it is often used as an expression of love, and saying "daisuke" (大好き) is a way of saying you really like someone.
  3. Know how "愛" is used. Ai is commonly heard when translating "love" to Japanese, but it's actually rarely used. It is meant as a very strong expression of love; saying "愛してる" (ai shiteru) is reserved for people you truly love, such as a very close partner.
  4. Know how "恋" is used. Koi is used when referring to love in third person, and as such, is not used as an expression of affection towards the person you're speaking to. It's not very commonly seen in expressions of affection as a result.
  5. Know the Japanese alphabets. When children and non-native Japanese speakers are learning how to write in Japanese, they initially start with learning hiragana, which are simple characters commonly used in Japanese writing. Katakana is another basic alphabet, but it is reserved for foreign words, such as names. Kanji are the characters derived from Chinese, which are much more complex to write than hiragana, but are sometimes used to help clarify the context of a sentence when reading.
  6. Know basic stroke order. Whether you're going to be writing in hiragana or kanji, you'll need to learn how to write properly, as writing with the wrong stroke order can make it look like your sentence says something else entirely. Stroke order typically sticks to two rules: if the stroke is horizontal, it most likely started on the left side, whereas if the stroke is vertical, it probably started at the top. There are a few exceptions, but not many.
    • While learning stroke order may seem pointless, it's actually necessary to learn in order to tell certain characters apart. For example, two katakana characters - シ and ツ, respectively - can be mistaken for the other character if written in improper stroke order and direction, which can jumble up a sentence at worst, and make it tough to read at best. Additionally, characters aren't always clearly written, as opposed to when they're printed on a screen, and there are other more cursive styles of writing that can make it crucial to write in proper stroke order.

Writing in Hiragana

  1. Write Su (す). Writing す can throw many people off at first because of the loop in the middle of the character, so feel free to practice if necessary.
    • Draw a medium-length horizontal line, starting on the left and going to the right.
    • Start drawing a vertical line in the middle of the horizontal line. Shortly after the lines connect, loop your line up into a circle, then bring it back down. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/b\/b2\/Jp-sk-hg-2.jpg\/460px-Jp-sk-hg-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/b\/b2\/Jp-sk-hg-2.jpg\/728px-Jp-sk-hg-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>License: <a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external text\" href=\"https:\/\/creativecommons.org\/licenses\/by-nc-sa\/3.0\/\">Creative Commons<\/a><br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}
  2. Write Ki (き). After writing す, you're going to need to write "ki" (き) in order to make it into a word, and not just a sound.
    • Draw a short horizontal line going from left to right.
    • Draw another horizontal line below the first one, making it slightly longer than the first horizontal line. Again, go from left to right. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/47\/Jp-sk-hg-4.jpg\/460px-Jp-sk-hg-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/47\/Jp-sk-hg-4.jpg\/728px-Jp-sk-hg-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>License: <a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external text\" href=\"https:\/\/creativecommons.org\/licenses\/by-nc-sa\/3.0\/\">Creative Commons<\/a><br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}
    • Starting above the center of the shorter horizontal line, draw a vertical line that slopes slightly to the right. After you've crossed both horizontal lines, swoop the line to the left and curve it back to the right, stopping once you're about a third of the way from connecting to the vertical line. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/c\/cb\/Jp-sk-hg-5.jpg\/460px-Jp-sk-hg-5.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/c\/cb\/Jp-sk-hg-5.jpg\/728px-Jp-sk-hg-5.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>License: <a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external text\" href=\"https:\/\/creativecommons.org\/licenses\/by-nc-sa\/3.0\/\">Creative Commons<\/a><br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}
  3. Finished.

Writing in Kanji

  1. Write a sharp line. To start writing the kanji for "suki", begin by drawing a vertical line from top-to-bottom that leans to the left. Then, change the direction it's moving in, so that the line, while still vertical, is directing towards the right.
  2. Draw a sharp curve. The second stroke in the kanji is somewhat similar to writing a "fu" in katakana (フ), so imitate the stroke order and simply stretch it out.
  3. Imitate the kanji for "ko" (子). To the right of the symbol you just wrote will be an imitation of the kanji 子, but smaller.
    • Start by drawing a horizontal line, going from left to right. Then make a sharp diagonal angle back inwards, stopping when your pen or pencil is perpendicular to the center of the horizontal line. Continue writing, but vertically, until you reach the bottom of the line you're writing on; once the line is that long, curve it back upwards a small amount.
    • Where the diagonal line becomes vertical, draw a horizontal line going from left to right. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/24\/Jp-sk-k-4.jpg\/460px-Jp-sk-k-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/24\/Jp-sk-k-4.jpg\/728px-Jp-sk-k-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>License: <a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external text\" href=\"https:\/\/creativecommons.org\/licenses\/by-nc-sa\/3.0\/\">Creative Commons<\/a><br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}
  4. Write Ki (き). The "ki" sound in 好き isn't connected to the kanji like one might expect - rather, the kanji is simply for the "su" sound, and hiragana is used for the "ki" sound. Writing き should be easy enough if you've practiced it enough times, however.
    • Write a short horizontal line, going from left to right.
    • Underneath the first line, write a slightly longer horizontal line. Again, go from left to right. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/fb\/Jp-sk-k-7.jpg\/460px-Jp-sk-k-7.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/fb\/Jp-sk-k-7.jpg\/728px-Jp-sk-k-7.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>License: <a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external text\" href=\"https:\/\/creativecommons.org\/licenses\/by-nc-sa\/3.0\/\">Creative Commons<\/a><br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}
    • Starting above the center of the shorter horizontal line, draw a vertical line that slopes slightly to the right. After you've crossed both horizontal lines, swoop the line to the left and curve it back to the right, stopping once you're about a third of the way from connecting to the vertical line. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/90\/Jp-sk-k-8.jpg\/460px-Jp-sk-k-8.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/90\/Jp-sk-k-8.jpg\/728px-Jp-sk-k-8.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":728,"bigHeight":546,"licensing":"<div class=\"mw-parser-output\"><p>License: <a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external text\" href=\"https:\/\/creativecommons.org\/licenses\/by-nc-sa\/3.0\/\">Creative Commons<\/a><br>\n<\/p><p><br \/>\n<\/p><\/div>"}
  5. Finished.

Tips

  • To write faster, write in a more cursive style of hiragana or kanji. While this isn't necessary to do, it can save you some time. Try to learn how to write normally first, though!
  • Japanese that was typed on a computer will look different than handwritten Japanese. 恋 and 愛, for example, look much more curved when written by hand than typed.

Warnings

  • Make sure to use proper stroke order. If you don't, it could look like you wrote something else entirely!
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